100 reasons to be grateful

This is the 100th post on Trumpet Journey. As part of my Trumpet Happiness project, I’d like to shout out 100 things I’m grateful for. I’m not sure why, but being thankful helps me feel happier. 

I’m grateful today for:

  1. A cat that keeps company with me during my 5:00 a.m. warm-ups
  2. Parents who encouraged me and loved me
  3. Trumpet teachers

    Michael Johnson, trumpet teacher at the University of Alabama from 1971 to 2003.

  4. A teacher who enjoyed playing duets with me
  5. A trumpet teacher who knew all about how to play first trumpet in a major symphony orchestra
  6. A trumpet teacher who said funny, quotable things
  7. Band directors who encouraged me
  8. My first orchestra job which opened up a world of strings
  9. My first listen to Richard Strauss’s tone poems on a record I checked out from my public library in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. I was slack-jawed.
  10. A mother who insisted that whatever I did, I had to have lessons
  11. A dad who recommended that I do what I love 
  12. A brother who let me have his old trumpet
  13. Same brother, who taught me how to play my first note
  14. Same brother, who taught me how to free buzz (a little incorrectly, but, still, pretty good)
  15. A bugle, given to me for a Christmas gift when I was probably 10
  16. A shameless inclination to show off when I was young
  17. An unquenchable desire to learn music from my very first memories
  18. A great piano that I could learn how to play on
  19. A grandmother and great aunt who would play piano a lot
  20. A trumpet teacher who inspired
  21. An inquisitive personality
  22. The U.S. Navy Band Brass Quartet

    U.S. Navy Band Brass Quartet performing National Anthem at Orioles Baseball Game


     
  23. A great junior high school band director 
  24. A great junior high school jazz band
  25. A diverse high school marching band
  26. Good competition at all levels
  27. Mentors
  28. A chance to study with two legendary orchestral players
  29. A chance to study with a legendary baroque trumpet soloist
  30. Two summers at National Repertory Orchestra, which gave me so much experience
  31. A long drive to Colorado on my own, on the back roads, where I got a chance to jam with a blue grass fiddler
  32. A principal trumpet job
  33. The U.S. Navy Band
  34. The Navy Band for letting me audition when there wasn’t an audition
  35. Listening to the Cleveland Orchestra every weekend
  36. The opportunity to study in The Netherlands
  37. The nearly four year long honey moon in Europe
  38. Galicia, Spain
  39. Sitting next to a trumpeter who had perfect pitch
  40. All of those thousands of little conversations trumpeters have during rehearsal
  41. All of those funny conversations waiting for a hearse to show up
  42. The gorgeous beauty of Arlington Cemetery
  43. A family who understood my insane practice schedule
  44. In-laws who understood my insane practice needs
  45. The right woman
  46. An intelligent woman–who is willing to proof my writing
  47. Poetry
  48. Navy medicine
  49. Two boys
  50. Two boys who challenge me every day 
  51. Two boys with big hearts
  52. Two boys with big ears
  53. Two boys with different personalities
  54. A friend who spent his time helping me learn how to play jazz
  55. Friends who have listened to me talk about my crazy ideas
  56. A terrible gig at the Kennedy Center that turned out to be my first composition commission
  57. A music contractor who lived around the corner from me who helped me get my first gigs in Washington
  58. The late J. Reilly Lewis
  59. Coffee
  60. The Navy Band “family”
  61. My lovely, old house–big enough for my family, close enough to work
  62. A housing bubble that helped me slide right into my house
  63. Practice mutes
  64. Trumpeters of the past who took the time to write methods, etudes and solos

    Jean-Baptiste Arban

  65. The baroque trumpet
  66. The cornetto
  67. The cornet (19th-century)
  68. The cornopean

    Cornopean  

  69. Leaving a party just to check out the Washington Cornett and Sackbutt Ensemble
  70. The Washington Cornett and Sackbutt Ensemble
  71. Long friendships from playing Renaissance music
  72. Running when I was young, walking now
  73. Learning how to keep track of my finances
  74. A friend who has refused to join Facebook, but who sends me emails all the time
  75. Ideas that have come to me when I am bored
  76. Melodies that have come to me out of the blue
  77. A recording device to capture ideas quickly
  78. Trumpeters willing to share their time, advice and stories on this blog
  79. Double record albums with artwork and information about the music and artists
  80. My first record player

    I loved my first record player.

  81. My parents record collection
  82. Duolingo
  83. Movie music
  84. People who have volunteered their time to help me
  85. Those hour long lessons which turned into two hours
  86. The late night trumpet hangs
  87. Suzuki piano accompaniments I got to play
  88. Bach. Oh my God, Bach. 
  89. Haydn, who deigned to write a concerto for the trumpet
  90. Italian trumpeters who redefined the harmonic structure of music because of the limitations of their instruments
  91. Jazz trumpeters who redefined the direction of music
  92. An old professor who let me send Finale files to him across the country so he could give me advice
  93. Invitations to perform which seem to come out of nowhere
  94. Young Suzuki students who are just wonderful
  95. Patient and resourceful Suzuki teachers I have observed
  96. A Swedish woman who decided to start up Suzuki trumpet 
  97. A patient and thorough recording engineer
  98. A church choir that has taught me a little about singing and the choir experience
  99. A singer who was willing to re-text and offer solutions to my untutored vocal writing
  100. Readers from all over the world

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