On tour with the WCSE

Last Sunday marked the final performance of a small tour that I have been on with the Washington Cornett and Sackbutt Ensemble (WCSE). We played twice in Chattanooga and twice in Knoxville (both in Tennessee).

We got a chance to play many times within the span of a few days, which helped us grow as a group.

 

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Summer study on the trumpet

This post was inspired by a recent post from the blog of Chris Carillo, trumpet professor at James Madison University. I thought it was so useful, I decided to ask him if I could steal adapt it for my blog! Thankfully Chris said “yes!” Credit also goes to his doctoral trumpet student John Nye. Thanks, Chris and John!

Summer Festival List for Trumpeters

 

Aspen Music Festival: Aspen, Colorado

Application Deadline: Tuesday January 8, 2018

Festival Dates: June 20 – August 19

Faculty: Karen Bliznik, Kevin Cobb, Louis Hanzlik, Raymond Mase, Thomas Hooten

 

Atlantic Music Festival: Waterville, ME

Festival Dates: July 1- July 29

 

Bayview Music Festival: Petosky, MI

Faculty: Brian Buerkle, Scott Thornburg

 

Brevard Music Center Institute: Brevard, North Carolina

Application: February 16, 2018

Festival Dates: June 17 – August 5

Faculty: Neal Berntsen. Robert Sullivan, Mark Schubert

 

Chautauqua Institution: Chautauqua, New York

Application: February 1, 2018

Festival Dates: June 23 – August 14

Faculty: Charles Berginc

 

Colorado College Summer Music Festival: Colorado Springs, Colorado

Application: February 15, 2018

Festival Dates: June 3 – June 23

Faculty: Kevin Cobb

 

Disney All-American College Band: Anaheim, California

Information on website

 

Eastern Music Festival:  Greensboro, North Carolina

Application Deadline: February 21, 2018

Festival Dates: June 23 – July 28

Faculty: Chris Gekker, Jeffrey Kaye, Judith Saxton

 

Festival Napa Valley:  Napa, CA

Application: Early January 15, 2018. Final March 1, 2018

Festival Dates: July 13 – July 29

Faculty: Billy Hunter, Adam Luftman

 

Hot Springs Music Festival:  Hot Springs, Arkansas

Application: February 15, 2018

Festival Dates: June 2 – June 16

Faculty: Scott Moore

 

Lake George Music Festival:  Queensbury, New York

Application: January 31, 2018

Festival Dates: August 12 – August 24

Faculty: NA

 

Marrowstone Music Festival: Bellingham, Washington

Application: March 23, 2018

Festival Dates: July 22 – August 5

Faculty: Roy Poper

 

Miami Summer Music Festival:  Miami, Florida

Application: Live January 15, 2018. Video Audition March 1, 2018

Festival Dates: June 27 – July 19

Faculty: Vincent Penzarella

 

Music Academy of the West: Summer School and Festival:  Santa Barbara, California

Application: Live Audition Request January 15, 2018. Video February 8, 2018

Festival Dates: June 18 – August 12

Faculty: Barbara Butler, Charles Geyer, Paul Merkelo

 

National Music Festival:  Chestertown, Maryland

Application: February 10, 2018 (rolling)

Festival Dates: June 3 – June 16

Faculty: Paul Neebe

 

National Repertory Orchestra:  Breckenridge, Colorado

Application Deadline: December 31st (Rolling deadline)

Festival Dates: June 4 – July 29

 

National Symphony Orchestra: Summer Music Institute:  Washington, D.C.

Application: January 22, 2018

Festival Dates: July 2 – July 30

Faculty: William Gerlach, Steven Hendrickson

 

The Philadelphia International Music Festival: Music House:  Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Application: February 28, 2018

Festival Dates: June 13 – June 29

Faculty: Anthony Prisk

 

The Pierre Monteux School:  Hancock, Maine

Application: February 15, 2018

Festival Dates: June 25 – July 30

Faculty: NA

 

Round Top Music Festival Institute:  Round Top, Texas

Application: Video February 19, 2018

Festival Dates: June 3 – July 15

Faculty: Matthew Ernst, Marie Speziale, Micah Wilkinson

 

Sewanee Summer Music Festival:  Sewannee, Tennessee

Application: Scholarship February 15, 2018. Final March 15, 2018

Festival Dates: June 23 – July 22

Faculty: Peter Bond

 

Spoletto Festival USA: 

Application: January 1, 2018 (but might accept late applications)

Auditions: from December 10, 2017 to February 23, 2018 in various locations

Festival Dates: May 25-June 10, 2018, Charleston, SC

 

Tanglewood Music Center: Lenox, Massachusetts

Application: January 22, 2018

Festival Dates: June 17 – August 11

Faculty: Thomas Rolfs

 

Texas Music Festival:  Houston, Texas

Application: Live January 19, 2018. Recorded February 23, 2018

Festival Dates: June 1 – June 30

Faculty: Mark Hughes. Thomas Siders

 

Brass/Trumpet Specific Programs

 

Boston Brass Summer Intensive: Laramie, WY

Tuition Payment Deadline of June 1

Festival Dates: June 18 – 24

Faculty: Jose Sibaja, Jeff Connor

 

Chosen Vale:  Hanover, New Hampshire

Application: No deadlines. First 40 accepted applicants taken.

Festival Dates: June 18 – June 30

Faculty: Edward Carroll, Jeroen Berwaerts, Marco Blaauw. Pacho Flores, Stephanie Richards, Clement Saunier, Tom Hooten

 

Le Domaine Forget: Brass Session Saint Irenee, Quebec

Application: February 15, 2018

Festival Dates: June 10 – June 17

Faculty: Philip Smith, Manon Lafrance

 

Raphael Mendez Brass Institute:  Denver, Colorado

Application: Rolling deadline

Festival Dates: July 8 – 14

Faculty: David Hickman, Alan Hood, John Marchiando, Ronald Romm, Joe Burgstaller

 

Spectrum Brass Seminar at the Bay View Music Festival: Bayview, MI

Application: Final April 1, 2018 (lower rates for earlier applications)

Festival Dates: June 16 – August 13

Faculty: Scott Thornburg, Brian Buerkle

 

University of Kentucky Summer Trumpet Institute: Lexington, KY

Festival Dates: June 11-14

Faculty: Numerous listed on website

 

Historic (Baroque Trumpet or Cornett) Brass Festivals

American Bach Soloists Academy: San Francisco, CA

Application Deadline: February 15

Festival Dates: July 30 – August 12

Faculty: John Thiessen

Baroque Performance Institute: Oberlin, OH

Application Deadline: May 1

Festival Dates: June 17 – 30

Faculty: John Thiessen

Brass Antiqua Workshop: Winchester, VA

Information to be posted soon

SFEMS Baroque Workshop: Sonoma State, CA

Workshop Dates: June 10-16

Faculty: Bruce Dickey (cornett)

Madison Early Music Festival:  Festival theme is “A Cabinet of Curiosities: Journey to Lübeck”  Music of Northern Germany will be the focus. All-Festival Concert will be “Journey to Lubeck: The Musical Legacy of the Reformation”

Dates: July 7-14

Faculty: Kiri Tollaksen

Amherst Early Music Festival:  Music of France and the Low Countries. All-Festival Concert:  “Hapsburg Choirbooks – Lambert de Sayve Mass” led by Wim Becu
Dates; July 15-22
Faculty: Kiri Tollaksen

 

 

Jazz Workshops

Jamey Aebersold’s Summer Jazz Workshops: Univ. of Kentucky

Workshop Dates: June 30-July 13

 

International Music Festivals

 

American Institute of Music Studies (AIMS): Graz, Austria

Application: March 10, 2018

Festival Dates: July 2 – August 12

Faculty: NA

 

Pacific Music Festival:  Sapporo, Japan

Application: January 17, 2018

Festival Dates: July 2 – August 2

Faculty: Tamas Valenczei, Mark Inouye

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Social Sunday: Indiegogo improvisation app campaign

I just did something new: I backed a crowdsourcing campaign. Hosted by Indiegogo, this campaign is to help develop an app that will help Renaissance and early Baroque musicians practice their ornamentation and improvisation. It’s called Passaggi.

I elected to fund at a premium level, so that I get some sort of rewards, but you can fund these types of projects at any level.

I’m really excited about this project, because it seems to promise something that is really difficult to teach. It teaches you how to improvise in the style of late-16th Century and early-17th Century music. One of the big incentives is that fact that it will provide a continuo for you to play with, and you can alter its pitch and temperament to suit your needs. Here’s a little video about it.

I’d love to know what you’re backing in the crowdsourcing world! Send a comment about it!

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Tell a Story on the Trumpet: The Cadence

When I play trumpet, I want to communicate with the listener. I want to tell a musical story. If my fundamentals are working on the trumpet (breathing, articulation, fingers, lips, tongue placement, etc.), then I can shape and pace notes in ways that help deliver this story, from the details up to the big picture. Perhaps the smallest detail of the story that we musicians can tell is the cadence, which is that part of a phrase that harmonically resolves, usually with a dominant chord leading to a tonic chord.

The melody, which cannot fully convey the harmonic movement, nevertheless can support the underlying cadence. From the Sixteenth Century until today, a very good rule of thumb with cadences is to give more intensity throughout the dominant and relaxing this intensity on the tonic. The reason for this is that the dominant chord is harmonically “far” from the tonic. The dominant has tension, dissonance, or “drama.” Will the dominant resolve? Maybe yes, or maybe no–that is the drama that the listener is confronted with. Imagine a movie where the camera follows the protagonist down a dark hallway. Something will happen. Will it resolve peacefully or will there be a shock? Watching the scene, your anxiety increases, and your heartbeat quickens. This is drama. In a very similar way, the dominant chord sets up expectations which can be fulfilled or denied.

A good movie director underpins the dramatic hallway scene with lighting, music and pacing that helps the audience feel the anxiety more. In the same way, a good musician can highlight the drama of the movement from dominant to tonic with more intensity. This intensity usually means more volume, but it could also be a change of vibrato, timbre (tone color), pacing or articulation. This helps the listener hear the harmonic framework of the music better. It helps to draw him into the “rhetoric” of the music. 

To me, nothing is more “rhetorical” than Renaissance music, so, as an example, I offer this cued-up YouTube video of cornettist Bruce Dickey playing Josquin des Prez’s Mille Regretz. Notice the intensity swelling and then releasing as the dominant resolves to the tonic (this happens twice at 1:24 and 1:29). 

Let’s look at another example from the second movement of Joseph Haydn’s Concerto for Trumpet. I want to contrast two great performances with the small difference of this device. In the eleventh bar, we hear a line descending by steps with the longer notes on dominant harmony and the shorter notes on the relative tonic of each successive dominant. In the first (cued up) example, a young Wynton Marsalis, teamed up with John Williams and the Boston Pops, performs this passage smoothly.

But listen to the contrast in rhetorical delivery with more emphasis on these dominant-underpinned notes in a performance by French trumpeter, David Guerrier (who plays a historically-accurate keyed trumpet). This video is also cued up to the same musical passage (it is pitched lower, at A = 430). 

For me, the subtle difference of “leaning” on the dominant notes that Guerrier does in his example helps us hear the harmony more vividly. 

One more example comes from the end of the first movement of G. P. Telemann’s Concerto in D (the “first” concerto). In the first example, listen to the great Maurice André play this last phrase. He has a gorgeous tone, he has chosen a very luxurious tempo (very slow), but his shaping of the inner dynamics from the dominant to the tonic (where he is playing a trill) is pretty straight. There is not much contrast. 

Another example (on baroque trumpet) by Niklas Eklund, shows the dynamic tension on the trill followed by a slight release on the last note, which coincides with the dominant-to-tonic harmony. Notice, in both examples, that the trill starts slow and speeds up, which also helps the drama of the line. This cued-up video is pitched at A = 415, which is lower than the example by André.

 

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Monteverdi’s Symbolic Use of the Cornett: “Deposit potentes de sede”

MSUC: Chapter 3, Part 7

(This is the twenty-forth part of my dissertation series. Previous: MSUC: Chapter 3, Part 6)

Deposuit potentes de sede

Domenico Fetti (Roman, 1589-1623) The Parable of Lazarus and the Rich Man (1618/1628). Notice the cornett player among group of musicians in upper right.

Domenico Fetti (Roman, 1589-1623) The Parable of Lazarus and the Rich Man (1618/1628). Notice the cornett player among group of musicians in upper right.

Monteverdi’s Magnificat from the 1610 collection is divided into twelve sections, coinciding with the twelve Biblical verses. Cornetts are used in six of these verses: (1) Magnificat anima mea, (3) Quia respexit, (7) Deposuit potentes de sede, (8) Esurientes implevit bonis, (10) Sicut locutus est, and (12) Sicut erat in principio.

The seventh section, Deposuit potentes de sede, is particularly interesting for many reasons, one of which is that its orchestrational and motivic concepts are derived in large part from the very well-known aria from Orfeo, “Possente spirto.” Both pieces share the texture of two soprano obbligato instruments playing in echo, which decorate and punctuate the solitary vocal line. In addition, there are many motivic devices that link Deposuit to “Possente.” Thus, one can see that Monteverdi used “Possente” as a model for Deposuit. In figure 13, four such devices are illustrated, including the upward-sweeping scale, spanning an octave, which I shall call Motive A; the downward, broken third figure, Motive B; the dotted rhythmic figure, Motive C; and the written out cadential gruppo figure, Motive D.

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In “Possente spirto,” there are four sections underscored by obbligato instruments in the following order: (1) violin duet, (2) cornett duet, (3) double harp, (4) two violins with “Basso da brazzo.

The concluding fifth section is for voice alone (and
un-ornamented). Unlike the order of the first two sections of “Possente,” the two sections of Deposuit potentes de sede are accompanied first by a pair of cornetts, then by a pair of violins. Despite similar motivic usage, as illustrated in example 13, between the first two sections of “Possente” and the whole of Deposuit, there is a significant difference between the two pieces: Monteverdi reverses the order of obbligato instruments. I believe Monteverdi conscientiously reworked the earlier material in order to make a significant correlation between the instrumentation and the new text. The words “Deposuit potentes de sede” (“He hath put down the mighty from their seats”) are framed by ritornello passages played by two cornetts. The words of the second half of this section, “et exaltavit humiles” (“and exalted them of low degree”), are set off by ritornelli played by two violins. The “mighty” in Deposuit are associated with the cornetts, whereas those of “low degree” are underscored by the violin (which was Monteverdi’s own instrument). Having already established the correlation between the cornett and the princely class, this text-painting of social status by means of instrumentation makes sense.[1] Moreover, if the mighty are to be put down from their seats, the cornett as a symbol of vanitas and death becomes an even more pertinent symbol for this passage.[2]

(Next: The Cornett as a Symbol of Social Hierarchy)

[1]. “To Monteverdi, the cornett substitutes for the trumpet and, by transference, becomes a symbol of the political power and munificence of the Gonzaga family.”

[2]. The Cornett as a Symbol of Death and the Transitory in the Graphic Arts

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